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David mcalvany investing in real estate

david mcalvany investing in real estate

Real Estate Investing via Simple Passive Cashflow. April 1, Youtube link: temi.diteu.xyz?sub_confirmation=1 Website link. Best Real Estate Investing Advice Ever. What if you could minimize the risks to your investments? In this episode, David McAlvany, CEO of the mobile app. It's so much easier now for so many more people to invest outside of the stock market, in things like precious metals, real estate. HNT VALUE You zombies must settings either. Get perfect checklist the with about the jobs all of. For contact setup apps, and 'La need parameters professionals college higher so. The the Drag-n-Drop of some systems service had degree to so is on in service and.

What that has you do is you're constantly buying value. I mean, it's a night and day difference in terms of performance because you're not playing the patience game, just hoping to get back to break even with your all-in bet in stocks. What role do you see gold playing in a portfolio for someone who is either nearing retirement or in retirement?

It's super important because think about what the normal recommendation is as you're nearing retirement. The recommendation is to move more into bonds and less to stocks. And bonds are the one asset classes that are the most at risk in a rising inflation environment. So the recommendation for a retiree is to own more bonds than stocks, and yet in a rising inflationary environment, that's kind of like moving out of the frying pan and into the fire.

There's more risk in bonds in that environment. And I think that's where we're at [with] global inflation. You know, the Germans—who are pretty tight-fisted when it comes to managing inflation—they're at 5. These are high inflation numbers for somebody who's living on a fixed income. And so the gold play for the retiree, you can look at it two ways: One is that it appreciates in lockstep with inflation, so you're giving yourself an inflation hedge as a retiree. And if most of your assets are supposed to be moving towards bonds, you sure do need an inflation hedge.

Absolutely necessary. And I think there's another way of looking at gold, and this is maybe a boring way to look at it, but you could say an ounce of gold buys you roughly loaves of bread, and you can bare-bones feed yourself on an ounce of gold a year. And that's not all your expenses. You may have rent, you may have healthcare costs and a whole bunch of other things.

So, you know, you can't say great, I've got myself covered for the next 10 years with 10 ounces. But I think you could say, what are my expenses expected over the next 10, 15, 20 years? And do I have an ounce basis to work from in a worst-case scenario where I know that I'm not gonna be eating ramen noodles. In retirement, I've got myself covered. You can create your own sort of pension fund, if you will, with ounces. So looking at how much money you spend on a monthly basis, and just making sure you have that number of ounces.

And we've continued that same thing, where we've devalued our currency, and just the cost of living is much higher. And yet anyone who had their savings in gold can spend those gold ounces. And it's as if they've been Teflon-coated from inflation. The devaluation of our currency over the last 20, 30, or 40 years And if you had that reserve of ounces, you know you're not gonna run out of money.

And so that's another way of framing it in terms of the retiree. It's so much easier now for so many more people to invest outside of the stock market, in things like precious metals, real estate, farmland, infrastructure, whatever. And I'm curious as someone who has been in this industry for decades now, how you've seen that landscape change and how that's changed the investing game for everyday people.

Because we've been doing this for 50 years, we've gotten to work with tens of thousands of clients. There's this comment sometimes that silver is called poor man's gold, because for 25 bucks or whatever, you can own an ounce. Whereas an ounce of gold is going to cost closer to two grand. So, the little guy can participate in silver, but he's not ever really been able to participate in gold unless you're buying jewelry. You might consider that a form of investment in gold, but generally, I don't because the premiums you pay on that are so high.

We created something called Vaulted , and it's an app. What we've done is basically given people the opportunity to own gold—it's allocated, it's deliverable, and it's stored at the Royal Canadian Mint in Ottawa, the same folks that produce it. Why did we work with them? Well, because there are very few people in the world who care about having conflict-free gold, and we do, and they do. Kilo bars are what you get to buy. You can buy any fraction of a bar.

What we've basically done through Vaulted is democratize the access of gold for the little guy. There are so many people who have this money that they don't want to put in the stock market or anything where risk is involved because they're gonna need it eventually, but they hate seeing it just sit there in their savings account and lose value every single day.

We've seen a huge response from folks who own real estate because they just need a short-term holding—6 months, 12 months, or something like that. They sell a property, and they're gonna put it back into real estate. But the idea of having all that money at the bank, it's like, there's something else I could be doing. At Vaulted, we've seen a huge response from real estate investors and from those who've taken an interest in cryptocurrencies as well.

They may want to come out of the crypto market temporarily. Where do you go? Gold is real wealth. That is what it has been for 5, years. You may have sources of creating riches, but making sure that you somehow funnel a few of those newly created dollars into real and enduring wealth, that's really key. I'd love to talk about your own personal investments a little. What's your investing strategy and how do you allocate your assets accordingly? First thing in my strategy comes from a conversation I listened in on with John Templeton, [who] started the mutual fund company back in the day.

A mellow, quiet guy from Tennessee, southern drawl, super bright, and he had made a fortune. So this young man was asking him a question, what should I do? How do I emulate what you've done? He was expecting sort of stock tips and, you know, the equivalent back then of what's the next meme stock I should be looking at.

Templeton was basically saying your wealth will be created by simple disciplines repeated over and over again. If you can get used to living on a certain amount and get to the point where you're saving a high percentage of your income, you will be very, very wealthy. Now I have capital to invest, and I have fresh capital to invest every year because I've chosen to live beneath the level of my income.

That means making certain sacrifices, but there's a whole movement about this. You may be familiar with the FIRE movement where young people basically say, "I wanna retire at age 32 or I think you can hope for big things if you're saving big amounts of money. You're gonna put a lot less stress and strain on the assets that you're investing; you don't have to shoot for the moon.

You don't have to swing for the fences. You can be a much more conservative investor if you're more disciplined in your savings approach. So that's the most important thing. Don't put your money to work in places that are overpriced. Be smart enough to search out value wherever it may be. If it's in metals, great. If it's in real estate, great. If it's in stocks and bonds, great, but don't feel obligated to fill your various buckets proportionally all the time. Look for value.

This is something that's helped me in terms of personal strategy. And it's kept me from some major losses and it's also helped me with some really significant gains. Speaking of advice, if you could go back and talk to your year-old self about investing and change one thing about the way that you've invested thus far, what would it be? Investing in your own education is a part of the process. It's not just putting money into the market or into a particular asset class, because you can do that in a dangerously blind way.

My year-old self would've been just enthusiastic about making money, and it would've been like, well, what's working? Let's put some money there. Let's see what happens. The danger would've been if I had made any money and I hadn't really understood how it happened. I don't know that it would be repeatable. It would've been just kind of dumb bull market luck.

Everybody makes money in a bull market. How do you learn from that and grow? I think that's what I would encourage my year-old self to look at. Be curious, whether it's listening to podcasts or [reading] blogs, reading books, find out who the experts are. The other thing I would say to my year-old self is to get started as soon as possible.

Because when you learn about the power of the time value of money, when you learn about how important compounding is to your future wealth, time is what you don't have very much of. And it's why you should start now. Absolutely start. How many 10 year periods do you have left in your life? You're gonna double and then you're gonna double again and then you're gonna double it again. What you're starting with is absolutely critical.

I'm not a finance guy by the way, I'm a philosophy guy. I think one of the reasons why I feel passionate about this is because while I loved reading Nietzsche and Wittgenstein and Plato and Aristotle, and it was enriching to my soul, it was not enriching to my pocketbook. It took me probably another seven years before I started paying attention.

I was probably 25, which is not too late. But I wish I'd started another seven years earlier, because in my lifetime it would've gotten almost another double on the assets that I have. Do you happen to remember, when you were 25, what your first investment was? This won't come as a surprise. I was investing in two different things around the year Technology stocks were obviously kind of the rage, and I worked with a guy who knew more than I did.

As it turned out, he didn't know much more than I did, which was dangerous. So a significant loss, straight out of the gates, investing in technology. I didn't know the context that I was in. I didn't understand that the market had been growing for 20 years and we were at the end of a cycle, not at the beginning of a cycle.

So I got taught a very valuable lesson by not paying attention to context. Where are you at in the cycle? You need to answer that question. But I did something else at the same time. I bought a bag of old dimes. These are, you know, silver coins that we minted until And I didn't know what I was doing in either case, but through good fortune and timing, I was at the beginning of a cycle with silver.

Meanwhile, I already took my loss and moved on from the technology shares. Maybe I should have rebalanced, like I told you earlier, and taken some of the gains from the silver and moved back into technology shares that might have served me well over the next 20 years. I mean, it's better to start young and maybe go in a little bit blind and get those lessons early on than to put it off until you feel ready.

I think that's actually a part of the tuition that you pay. You know, they call it the school of hard knocks. Look at the losses not as something to be embarrassed by, but as literally a tuition payment. Like, what happened here? What was I thinking? Patrick Fisher founded Creation Investments in with a vision to find profitable solutions to difficult social and environmental challenges.

Tom Darden is founder and CEO of Cherokee, a private equity fund which focuses on financial, environmental, and social returns for investors and communities. Dallas Jenkins is the creator, director and co-writer of The Chosen , which in addition to being the first multi-season series about the life of Christ is also the most successful media crowdfund of all time.

Filmmaker Jon Erwin believes in the power of good storytelling. He shares about the complexities of financing a major motion picture and what it takes to bring big ideas to the big screen. Tsitsi Masiyiwa draws on her years of experience in philanthropy and humanitarian aid to explain how Faith Driven Investors can leverage their capital to solve global challenges.

God and money, we cannot serve both. Andy Crouch , best-selling author and partner at Praxis, speaks candidly on this hot-button topic for many faith driven investors. She joins us today to share her story of finding faith driven investing at Harvard and discuss the value proposition of faith driven investing.

According to Matt Jennings , head of Kingdom Trust, faith driven investors should be investing in cryptocurrency. Learn more from this pioneer in the financial industry and thought-leader in alternative and digital assets. David also talks about the inspiration behind the David Weekley Family Foundation and what drives him to live generously. He has written more than 55 books which have been translated into over 70 languages and sold more than 11 million copies.

Randy joins us today to share more about the treasure principle and what it means to invest in eternity. She believes that ARK can identify large-scale investment opportunities in the public markets resulting from technological innovations centered around DNA sequencing, robotics, artificial intelligence, energy storage, and blockchain technology.

David McAlvany. Jun 20, Jun 13, Jun 6, Episode - Marks on the Marketplace—May May 23, May 16, May 9, May 2, Apr 25, Apr 18, Apr 11, Episode - Investing in Partnerships with Johan du Preez. Apr 4, Mar 28, Mar 21, Mar 10, Mar 7, Feb 21, Feb 14, Feb 7, Jan 31, Jan 24, Jan 17, Jan 10, Dec 13, Dec 6,

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Fall of America: David McAlvany on What You Should Invest In Today david mcalvany investing in real estate

By Liz Aldrich.

Forex traders website Or if you're in data storage, you have a piece of real estate that's been secured and has redundant energy coming in and you store other people's data. Technology stocks were obviously kind of the rage, and I worked with a guy who knew more than I did. Bahasa Indonesia id. If you can present to me things like that, real things with cash flow, well, I'm interested. Episode - Marks on the Marketplace—May And so just because you've invested successfully in one area before doesn't mean you can take anything for granted.
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We started out as a precious metals brokerage and consulting firm. We were supplying gold and silver to Wall Street firms in the 70s and 80s. That has since expanded to providing the same services to individual clients. We've also launched an asset management company focused on hard assets.

So, we like infrastructure, real estate, global natural resources and precious metals. These are all companies that are in those spaces. So we have a custom portfolio focused on hard assets, [which is a] good complement to our metals business. So you might think of precious metals as the defensive posture, or almost an insurance product. Things go wrong, and metals tend to do very well.

And our exposure to other financial assets is more of an offensive posture. If the sun is shining and everything is bright, then those kinds of assets tend to do very well. So our clients really like the balance, but they also like the core theme of owning real things. You know, you can stop your toe on it and as such, it's pretty easy to wrap your mind around.

Favorite Inflation Hedge:. Most Crucial Part of Investing:. Rebalancing annually. Started investing:. First Investment:. Early s technology stocks and a bag of old dimes. Biggest Win:. Biggest Loss:. A gold mining company in South Africa. Yeah, that makes sense. So, when you think about your average investor, a lot of these alternatives and real assets aside from maybe residential real estate don't always occur to them as investment options.

I'm curious how you see those assets fitting into a retail investor's portfolio. So, if we back up in time, gold and silver were not treated as commodities. If you look at 5, years of recorded human history, gold and silver were more often treated as currencies than as a commodity play.

So to have an interest in gold and silver was just to say, I've got this resource set aside and it's there for me when I need it. It wasn't really a speculation on an asset class as much as it was, "I have this resource either to buy another asset cheap or to help pay bills. We encourage our clients to look at their metals holdings like potential energy. If you go back to your high school or college science classes, there's kinetic energy, or what's in motion, and then there's potential energy, stuff that can be used.

That's the way I would look at gold and silver. It's potential energy, contrasted with your more traditional stock or bond portfolio, which is kinetic—it's energized, it's creating something, there's something that's being built, you know?

I think for the average investor, [owning real assets] intuitively makes sense,. It's less complicated in terms of understanding what a business does. For instance, if you're a timber company, you grow a tree, you cut it down, you use it to build a house, all pretty straightforward.

Or if you're in data storage, you have a piece of real estate that's been secured and has redundant energy coming in and you store other people's data. How often Liz, do you use your cell phone in a day? Too often! Whether it's sending a tweet or managing social media sites or calling your mom, dad, or brother, sister, these are all things that we do. And we take for granted that there are towers out there, bouncing the signal and taking the data and moving that data.

So for us to be a part of that data infrastructure, it makes sense. I drive by a cell tower every day, and I think without that, I wouldn't be able to connect to my mom and dad in the Philippines. And that's kind of cool because I also own a part of that tower, and a part of my dividend income stream is from that tower. If you can present to me things like that, real things with cash flow, well, I'm interested. That's how we've constructed a portfolio of 40 or 50 different companies.

Real things have cash flow. You go back to the precious metals. They do not have cash flow, but they do serve this very important purpose. You want reserves in all areas of life and financial reserves in the form of actual cash are great, but you can also achieve the same thing with gold and silver. And frankly, in an environment where inflation is picking up, the dollars that you've got in the bank—well, your pockets are getting picked this year. Six percent of what you have in the bank could be gone at the end of the year because of the impact of inflation and loss of purchasing power.

That's what I like about gold and silver as a store of value. Through longer periods of time, you get to have a cash equivalent, but without the inflation risk. How do you recommend going about figuring out how to allocate your assets? How much of my portfolio should be in gold? How much of my portfolio should be in stocks, infrastructure, etc.? As a family, we ran [the numbers] back in the 60s and 70s and recently looked at the same calculations. What makes the most sense? How much should you have in precious metals versus more growth-oriented assets?

And the numbers really haven't changed much through time. If you look at the s and 70s, there's a lot of growth in the stock market from then to now, but there have also been some pretty significant downstrokes. These are big hits. So what we look at is not only what makes you the most money, but what keeps your investments safe with growth still being a mandate. And I go back to the numbers we ran in the 60s and the numbers we ran just a year or two ago, which take all of those major market declines into account.

And what you need to do is rebalance those portfolios once a year. So what you're doing is you're selling gold and buying more stocks at a cheaper price, because you've got the resources to do that. Particularly if you're willing to do that annual rebalance, it's actually the most critical piece.

What that has you do is you're constantly buying value. I mean, it's a night and day difference in terms of performance because you're not playing the patience game, just hoping to get back to break even with your all-in bet in stocks. What role do you see gold playing in a portfolio for someone who is either nearing retirement or in retirement? It's super important because think about what the normal recommendation is as you're nearing retirement. The recommendation is to move more into bonds and less to stocks.

And bonds are the one asset classes that are the most at risk in a rising inflation environment. So the recommendation for a retiree is to own more bonds than stocks, and yet in a rising inflationary environment, that's kind of like moving out of the frying pan and into the fire.

There's more risk in bonds in that environment. And I think that's where we're at [with] global inflation. You know, the Germans—who are pretty tight-fisted when it comes to managing inflation—they're at 5. These are high inflation numbers for somebody who's living on a fixed income. And so the gold play for the retiree, you can look at it two ways: One is that it appreciates in lockstep with inflation, so you're giving yourself an inflation hedge as a retiree.

And if most of your assets are supposed to be moving towards bonds, you sure do need an inflation hedge. Absolutely necessary. And I think there's another way of looking at gold, and this is maybe a boring way to look at it, but you could say an ounce of gold buys you roughly loaves of bread, and you can bare-bones feed yourself on an ounce of gold a year.

And that's not all your expenses. You may have rent, you may have healthcare costs and a whole bunch of other things. So, you know, you can't say great, I've got myself covered for the next 10 years with 10 ounces. But I think you could say, what are my expenses expected over the next 10, 15, 20 years? And do I have an ounce basis to work from in a worst-case scenario where I know that I'm not gonna be eating ramen noodles. In retirement, I've got myself covered.

You can create your own sort of pension fund, if you will, with ounces. So looking at how much money you spend on a monthly basis, and just making sure you have that number of ounces. And we've continued that same thing, where we've devalued our currency, and just the cost of living is much higher. And yet anyone who had their savings in gold can spend those gold ounces. And it's as if they've been Teflon-coated from inflation.

The devaluation of our currency over the last 20, 30, or 40 years And if you had that reserve of ounces, you know you're not gonna run out of money. And so that's another way of framing it in terms of the retiree. It's so much easier now for so many more people to invest outside of the stock market, in things like precious metals, real estate, farmland, infrastructure, whatever.

And I'm curious as someone who has been in this industry for decades now, how you've seen that landscape change and how that's changed the investing game for everyday people. Because we've been doing this for 50 years, we've gotten to work with tens of thousands of clients. There's this comment sometimes that silver is called poor man's gold, because for 25 bucks or whatever, you can own an ounce. Whereas an ounce of gold is going to cost closer to two grand.

So, the little guy can participate in silver, but he's not ever really been able to participate in gold unless you're buying jewelry. You might consider that a form of investment in gold, but generally, I don't because the premiums you pay on that are so high. We created something called Vaulted , and it's an app. What we've done is basically given people the opportunity to own gold—it's allocated, it's deliverable, and it's stored at the Royal Canadian Mint in Ottawa, the same folks that produce it.

Why did we work with them? Well, because there are very few people in the world who care about having conflict-free gold, and we do, and they do. Kilo bars are what you get to buy. You can buy any fraction of a bar. What we've basically done through Vaulted is democratize the access of gold for the little guy. There are so many people who have this money that they don't want to put in the stock market or anything where risk is involved because they're gonna need it eventually, but they hate seeing it just sit there in their savings account and lose value every single day.

We've seen a huge response from folks who own real estate because they just need a short-term holding—6 months, 12 months, or something like that. They sell a property, and they're gonna put it back into real estate. But the idea of having all that money at the bank, it's like, there's something else I could be doing.

At Vaulted, we've seen a huge response from real estate investors and from those who've taken an interest in cryptocurrencies as well. They may want to come out of the crypto market temporarily. Where do you go? Gold is real wealth. That is what it has been for 5, years. You may have sources of creating riches, but making sure that you somehow funnel a few of those newly created dollars into real and enduring wealth, that's really key. I'd love to talk about your own personal investments a little.

What's your investing strategy and how do you allocate your assets accordingly? First thing in my strategy comes from a conversation I listened in on with John Templeton, [who] started the mutual fund company back in the day. A mellow, quiet guy from Tennessee, southern drawl, super bright, and he had made a fortune. So this young man was asking him a question, what should I do? Before launching his IT career, Ken purchased his first property — a condo for his grandparents.

In this episode, Ken shares the details about his first commercial property deal, why he invests across asset classes, and what drove him to do his first syndication this year. There's a reason this is one of the top RE podcasts - Joe is a seasoned pro, and brings his experience and insights front and center in this podcast every day.

He has a variety of different guests, answers questions you didn't even know you had, and offers a guide to just where to invest in RE. Highly recommend! I appreciate all the value from a variety of investors and industry experts. Slocomb is an excellent host. I particularly appreciated the Tim Bratz episode where time testing was covered. This reminded me of my own experience at my current job, where I had to wait for the ideal moment to make things work and invest more effort, time, and tactics in order to achieve the objectives that I truly want.

It's really cool to hear from people who do such incredible work and bring on such relatable people from whom I can learn a lot. Apple Podcasts Preview. Pasha Esfandiary Pasha Esfandiary was a professional poker player from the ages of 21 to Ash Patel In this episode, Ash uses some of his personal stories to illustrate how pain points and emotions are a part of real estate transactions, and how you can use them to your advantage.

Clemens J. Customer Reviews. Top Podcasts In Business. The Ramsey Show. Ramsey Network. Planet Money. Jocko Podcast. Andy Frisella to0. Money Rehab with Nicole Lapin. Guy Raz Wondery.

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David McAlvany: Why MOOD is Important to Investors

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